Boys and Their Toys

Contemporary self-making often requires dramatic reinvention. Left: A shy midwesterner, Marion Michael Morrison, transformed himself into John Wayne, the most readily identifiable masculine icon of the decades following World War II. (Publicity photography) Bottom: And President George W. Bush, son and grandson of aristocratic New England bluebloods, who repped at Andover, graduated from Yale and … Continue reading Boys and Their Toys

Visualizing Deviance: The Promiscuous (Heterosexual World of Sport)

Before I was married, I truly lived the bachelor’s life. I’m no Wilt Chamberlain, but as I traveled around NBA cities, I was never at a loss for female companionship. . . . There were just some bachelors almost every woman in L.A. wanted to be with: Eddie Murphy, Arsenio Hall, and Magic Johnson. I … Continue reading Visualizing Deviance: The Promiscuous (Heterosexual World of Sport)

Men Talking About Violence. Effects of Violence: Emotional Effects

“It is not possible to endure repeated physical attack, to sustain repeated injuries, and to live in an atmosphere of fear of repeat victimization without experiencing anxiety and emotional tension. While the long-term effects of violence and permanent emotional damage cannot be assumed, there can be little doubt that such an atmosphere causes considerable stress, … Continue reading Men Talking About Violence. Effects of Violence: Emotional Effects

Ideology Interpellates Individuals as Subjects

Ideology Interpellates Individuals as Subjects This thesis is simply a matter of making my last proposition explicit: there is no ideology except by the subject and for subjects. Meaning, there is no ideology except for concrete subjects, and this destination for ideology is only made possible by the subject: meaning, by the category of the … Continue reading Ideology Interpellates Individuals as Subjects

Orientalism Now: Popular Images and Social Science Representations

“Here are a few examples of how the Arab is often represented today. Note how readily “the Arab” seems to accommodate the transformations and reductions--all of a simply tendentious kind--into which he is continually being forced.” (p. 285) “[...] after the 1973 war the Arab appeared everywhere as something more menacing. Cartoons depicting an Arab … Continue reading Orientalism Now: Popular Images and Social Science Representations