Revolution and counterrevolution in Afghanistan

Great albeit short article about the history (and immediate aftermath) of the Democratic Republic of Afghanistan.

Allow Me To Explain

In 1978 the Saur Revolution swept across the central Asian country of Afghanistan uprooting backwards social and property relations and liberating women from domestic slavery, abuse and extreme oppression.

Background
Afghanistan is a country with a long and complicated history. Throughout the years, it came under the influence of  many different groups, from the Kushans to the Iranians to the Greeks to the Mongols.

Map of Afghanistan today.

The Durrani empire was established in 1747, with a man of Pashtun ethnicity named Ahmed Shah Durrani at its head. Besides a very short period in 1929 when a Khan named Bacha-i-Saqa briefly overthrew the government and named himself emir, every Afghan leader belonged to Ahmed Shah Durrani’s tribal confederation.

In the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries the people of Afghanistan fought against the British imperialists several times resulting in various parts of the country falling under British control.

The borders of modern Afghanistan resulted from…

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How to Avoid the Kisses of Death in the Graduate School Application Process

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Debunking Hayek’s Road to Serfdom: Economic Planning and “Totalitarianism” (Part 3)

Hayek’s “Road to Serfdom” is your typical “classical liberal” (or “libertarian”/”anarchist”) philosophy book, and this post does a great job of dissecting most of the usual talking points employed by Hayek (and, by extension, his various disciples).

Anti-Imperialism.org

Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3

Chapter 6: Planning and the Rule of Law

As the title would suggest, Hayek begins chapter six by promoting what he refers to as the ‘Rule of Law’. While many legal and political interpretations exist of the ‘Rule of Law’, Hayek importantly draws distinction between his version of this ‘Law’ and what he calls “arbitrary government”. He goes onto provide a fairly concise explanation of what he means at the most basic level:

“Stripped of all technicalities, this means that government in all its actions is bound by rules fixed and announced beforehand – rules which make it possible to foresee with fair certainty how the authority will use its coercive powers in given circumstances and to plan one’s individual affairs ont he basis of this knowledge.” [1] 

Essentially, what Hayek is describing is more than simply the ‘rule of law’…

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Individual and Institutional Racism

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The racial dimension of mass incarceration is its most striking feature . . .

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