Debunking Hayek’s Road to Serfdom: Economic Planning and “Totalitarianism” (Part 3)

Hayek’s “Road to Serfdom” is your typical “classical liberal” (or “libertarian”/”anarchist”) philosophy book, and this post does a great job of dissecting most of the usual talking points employed by Hayek (and, by extension, his various disciples).

Anti-Imperialism.org

Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3

Chapter 6: Planning and the Rule of Law

As the title would suggest, Hayek begins chapter six by promoting what he refers to as the ‘Rule of Law’. While many legal and political interpretations exist of the ‘Rule of Law’, Hayek importantly draws distinction between his version of this ‘Law’ and what he calls “arbitrary government”. He goes onto provide a fairly concise explanation of what he means at the most basic level:

“Stripped of all technicalities, this means that government in all its actions is bound by rules fixed and announced beforehand – rules which make it possible to foresee with fair certainty how the authority will use its coercive powers in given circumstances and to plan one’s individual affairs ont he basis of this knowledge.” [1] 

Essentially, what Hayek is describing is more than simply the ‘rule of law’…

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Individual and Institutional Racism

  “Racism is both overt and covert. It takes two, closely related forms: individual whites acting against individual blacks, and acts by the total white community against the black community. We call these individual racism and institutional racism. The first consists of overt acts by individuals, which cause death, injury or the violent destruction of … Continue reading Individual and Institutional Racism

The racial dimension of mass incarceration is its most striking feature . . .

“The racial dimension of mass incarceration is its most striking feature. No other country imprisons so many of its racial or ethnic minorities. The United States imprisons a larger percentage of its black population than South Africa did at the height of apartheid. In Washington, D.C., it is estimated that three out of four young … Continue reading The racial dimension of mass incarceration is its most striking feature . . .

Beyond the Big Names of the Civil Rights Movement

“It was Jo Ann Robinson and E.D. Nixon, not Dr. King, that led the spark that created a successful Montgomery Bus Boycott. This story of grassroots activists, of unnamed women and men who made a critical difference, was duplicated a thousand times across the South. [...] So, the Civil Rights Movement was not simply an … Continue reading Beyond the Big Names of the Civil Rights Movement

No Excuses for a Racist Murderer

“Each year on the 19th of January, there is renewed effort to canonize Robert E. Lee, the greatest confederate general. His personal comeliness, his aristocratic birth and his military prowess all call for the verdict of greatness and genius. But one thing–one terrible fact–militates against this, and that is the inescapable truth that Robert E. … Continue reading No Excuses for a Racist Murderer

Robert K. Merton, “Foreword to a Preface for an Introduction to a Prolegomenon to a Discourse on a Certain Subject

“There can be no doubt, I think, that the subject we are about to consider is one of the profound importance to us all. Indeed, this hardly needs to be said. Surely, the significance of the issues we are to examine here is almost self-evident. And yet, there are indications from time to time that … Continue reading Robert K. Merton, “Foreword to a Preface for an Introduction to a Prolegomenon to a Discourse on a Certain Subject

The Irresponsibility of Guilt

“Change and learning occur most readily when you (a) recognize that an error has occurred and (b) develop a strategy for correcting the problem. An attitude of self-love and relaxation facilitates this, whereas guilt often interferes. . . .”

Feminist Masculinity

Philosophical Fragments

Feminist masculinity presupposes that it is enough for males to have value, that they do not have to “do,” to “perform,” to be affirmed and loved. Rather than defining strength as “power over,” feminist masculinity defines strength as one’s capacity to be responsible for self and others. This strength is a trait males and females need to possess. In The Courage to Raise Good Men, Olga Silverstein stresses the need to redefine male sex roles in ways that break with sexist norms. Currently, sexist definitions of male roles insist on defining maleness in relationship to winning, one-upmanship, domination: “Until we are willing to question many of the specifics of the male sex role, including most of the seven norms and stereotypes that psychologist Robert Levant names in a listing of its chief constituents–’avoiding femininity, restrictive emotionality, seeking achievement and status, self-reliance…

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The Language of Gender Violence, Jackson Katz

“[Men and masculinity] have been rendered invisible in much of the discourse. Dominant groups often go unchallenged in society, and their power and privilege goes unexamined. [Gender violence issues] affect women at every level, but I am here to say that the very fact of just calling these issues ‘women’s issues’ is in itself part of … Continue reading The Language of Gender Violence, Jackson Katz

Mike Riggs on “Real Men”

“Some thoughts on macho talk regarding the Montana incident. The idea that real men occasionally hit, and that real men hit back, is bad for men. I say this as someone who was much bigger than other humans starting at around age five, and who used his fist from an early age. I spent many … Continue reading Mike Riggs on “Real Men”