The Continuing Struggle

“[F]reedom of speech is by no means a deeply entrenched tradition even in the United States, which by comparative standards is quite advanced in this regard. The same is true of other rights. [...] As is well known, even the right to vote was achieved in the United States only through constant struggle. Women were … Continue reading The Continuing Struggle

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How to Avoid the Kisses of Death in the Graduate School Application Process

Personal statements Avoid references to your mental health. Such statements could create the impression you may be unable to function as a successful graduate student. Avoid making excessively altruistic statements. Graduate faculty could interpret these statements to mean you believe a strong need to help others is more important to your success in graduate school … Continue reading How to Avoid the Kisses of Death in the Graduate School Application Process

Introduction to New Departures in Marxian Theory

“. . . As earlier anti-slavery movements eventually went beyond reformist demands for slaves to be treated better to arrive at the fundamental demand to abolish slavery per se, so Marxists go beyond the reformist critics of capitalism to demand its abolition as a class structure. If human beings must be free to be fully … Continue reading Introduction to New Departures in Marxian Theory

Wanted: Vulnerable, Debt-Burdened College Students for U.S. Imperialism

The other day, I received a notification of an army recruiter hoping to increase the numbers of college students enrolled in the reserves.[1] Repeated on roughly every paragraph by the recruiter was how little stress and time it would take and how enlistment would lead (eventually) to student loan repayment (“regardless if you have current … Continue reading Wanted: Vulnerable, Debt-Burdened College Students for U.S. Imperialism

Debunking Hayek’s Road to Serfdom: Economic Planning and “Totalitarianism” (Part 3)

Hayek’s “Road to Serfdom” is your typical “classical liberal” (or “libertarian”/”anarchist”) philosophy book, and this post does a great job of dissecting most of the usual talking points employed by Hayek (and, by extension, his various disciples).

Anti-Imperialism.org

Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3

Chapter 6: Planning and the Rule of Law

As the title would suggest, Hayek begins chapter six by promoting what he refers to as the ‘Rule of Law’. While many legal and political interpretations exist of the ‘Rule of Law’, Hayek importantly draws distinction between his version of this ‘Law’ and what he calls “arbitrary government”. He goes onto provide a fairly concise explanation of what he means at the most basic level:

“Stripped of all technicalities, this means that government in all its actions is bound by rules fixed and announced beforehand – rules which make it possible to foresee with fair certainty how the authority will use its coercive powers in given circumstances and to plan one’s individual affairs ont he basis of this knowledge.” [1] 

Essentially, what Hayek is describing is more than simply the ‘rule of law’…

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Individual and Institutional Racism

  “Racism is both overt and covert. It takes two, closely related forms: individual whites acting against individual blacks, and acts by the total white community against the black community. We call these individual racism and institutional racism. The first consists of overt acts by individuals, which cause death, injury or the violent destruction of … Continue reading Individual and Institutional Racism

“The public is not sovereign over the media . . .”

“The public is not sovereign over the media--the owners and managers, seeking ads, decide what is to be offered, and the public must choose among these. People watch and read in good part on the basis of what is readily available and intensively promoted. Polls regularly show that the public would like more news, documentaries, … Continue reading “The public is not sovereign over the media . . .”